Dietary salt

Dietary saltExcess dietary salt is famous for increasing blood pressure – blood volume increases, and forces the heart to pump harder against the pressure, and the structural changes that harden the blood vessel wall. This hardening occur in response to these high pressures.

Statistics show that about one-third of all American adults and over 50% of those over the age of 55 have hypertension. And this elevated blood pressure accounts for 62% of strokes and 49% of coronary heart disease. Also, dietary salt is not only dangerous to the cardiovascular system, but also contributes to kidney disease, osteoporosis , ulcers, and stomach cancer.

In the 1990s, it was found that the relationship between salt intake and stroke mortality was stronger than the relationship between blood pressure and stroke mortality.  Excess sodium in the diet affects sodium concentrations in the blood, which affects the cells of the blood vessel wall and blood volume. The eventual results are long-term changes in vessel wall structure, including thickening of the vessel wall and arterial stiffening.

Reducing dietary salt is not only important for those who already have elevated blood pressure – limiting added salt is essential for all of us to keep our cardiovascular systems in proper working order. On top of consuming the vast majority of our calories from phytochemical-rich, unrefined plant foods, salt avoidance adds another layer of protection against heart attack and stroke. It is also important to remember that a low fat, flexitarian or vegan diet plus a low cholesterol level does not protect you from developing high blood pressure later in life from years of using too much salt; it also does not protect you against the risk of later life hemorrhagic stroke, as long as you overly salt your food.

Two studies presented at the American Society for Nephrology’s annual meeting earlier this month are beginning to build data on the links between diet and kidney disease. The researchers used data from the Nurses’ Health Study to correlate intake of sodium and sweetened beverages with kidney function in 3,000 women over an 11-year period.

In the first study, the authors found that higher dietary sodium intake was associated with a greater decline in kidney function over that 11-year time frame.  Excessive sodium intake is already well-known to promote hypertension and consequently heart disease, and now we have one more reason to avoid it.

In the second study, women who drank two or more servings per day of artificially sweetened soda doubled their odds of kidney function decline.

Sure, we save a few calories drinking a diet soda, but does that really help us? Scientific studies have linked artificial sweeteners and/or diet soda to weight gain, diabetes, cancer, and heart disease.

As a society, we disregard these possible dangers to the detriment of our health. We have grown accustomed to the intense saltiness of restaurant meals and processed foods, and the intense artificial sweetness of aspartame, acesulfame K, and sucralose. By cutting these harmful substances out of our diets, we can begin to enjoy the more subtle flavors of natural whole foods, and benefit our kidneys in the process.

Source: disease proof

Recommendation:

  1. Books on Refined food
  2. Fight the impurities with adequate Antioxidant
  3. Substitute the lost fibre

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